Episode 249:

Clear of Debris

Serial Killer Lavinia Fisher

Karen

Byron David Smith

Georgia

Episode 249: Clear of Debris

In this week’s quilt episode, Karen and Georgia cover serial killer Lavinia Fisher and murderer Byron David Smith.

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Serial Killer Lavinia Fisher

Serial Killer Lavinia Fisher Notes:

Header Image Source: Photo by Larry Costales on Unsplash

Other Images:

Supposed Lavinia Fisher painting (via Legends of America)

Old City Jail (via Gothic Horror Stories)

 

The Byron David Smith killings occurred on Thanksgiving Day of 2012, when Haile Kifer, 18, and her cousin, Nicholas Brady, 17, broke into the home of Byron David Smith, 64, in Little Falls, Minnesota, in the United States. Smith, armed with a Ruger Mini-14, shot the teens separately and minutes apart as they entered the basement where he was, later stating to police he was worried about them being armed.

The case sparked debate over the "castle doctrine", which allows a homeowner to defend their home with lethal force. The prosecution alleged that Smith's actions and a recording he made himself while the incidents were unfolding showed premeditation (see lying in wait) and that he used excessive force after having neutralized the threat. He was convicted by a jury after three hours of deliberation and sentenced to life in prison.

On November 22, 2012, Smith drove his vehicle down the road, parking it in front of a neighbor's home. Later that day, Kifer and Brady broke into Smith's home. Video surveillance captured the teens casing the property prior to the break-in.

By his own account to police, Smith had been visiting neighbors when he saw Kifer, who he suspected was responsible for the burglaries, driving towards his home. He commented that he needed to get ready for her and went back to his home. Upon entering his home, Smith turned on a recording device he owned. He removed the lightbulbs from the ceiling lights and positioned himself in a chair that was obscured from view. He heard the window upstairs break and Brady climb in (captured on audio). Smith then waited in silence for 12 minutes, until Brady began to descend into the basement. Smith shot Brady twice on the stairs, and once in the head after he fell to the bottom of the stairs. Smith then made taunting remarks to Brady's body, wrapped it in a tarp and dragged him into another room. He went upstairs, and 10–15 minutes later, he ran back down into the basement, reloaded his weapon and took up his previous position in the obscured chair. Minutes later, Kifer entered the home and could be heard calling her cousin's name. As she made her way down the stairs, Smith shot her. Wounded, she fell down the stairs, and Byron can be heard on the recording saying "Oh, sorry about that" after his gun jams, followed by Kifer saying "Oh, my God" very quickly; Smith shoots her again, multiple times in the torso, in the midst of which she screams "Oh, my god!" and once next to her left eye with a High Standard Double Nine Convertible .22-caliber single-action revolver.[ He repeatedly called her derogatory names and then dragged her into the other room, tossing her body on top of her cousin's, and shot her one final time under the chin, killing her. Audio and video of the events were recorded by Smith's security system..."

— Source: Byron David Smith Killings Wikipedia

Byron David Smith

Byron David Smith Notes:

Header Image Source: Photo by Andreea Swank on Unsplash

Other Images:

Byron David Smith (via Daily Beast)

Bryon’s basement hiding spot (via Murderpedia)

Haile Kifer & Nick Brady (via NY Daily News)

 

"Lavinia Fisher (1793 – February 18, 1820) is reported by some legends to have been the first female serial killer in the United States of America. Her origins are unknown; however, Fisher resided in the United States for much of her life. She was married to John Fisher, and both were convicted of highway robbery—a capital offense at the time—not murder.

Historians have begun to question the veracity of the traditional legend and some assert that Lavinia Fisher never killed anyone. She was, however, an active member of a large gang of highwaymen who operated out of two houses in the backcountry near Charleston, the Five Mile House and the Six Mile House. It is not clear whether the Six Mile House was a hotel, but it served as a hideout for a number of outlaws.

Lavinia Fisher (1793 – February 18, 1820) is reported by some legends to have been the first female serial killer in the United States of America. Her origins are unknown; however, Fisher resided in the United States for much of her life. She was married to John Fisher, and both were convicted of highway robbery—a capital offense at the time—not murder.

Historians have begun to question the veracity of the traditional legend and some assert that Lavinia Fisher never killed anyone. She was, however, an active member of a large gang of highwaymen who operated out of two houses in the backcountry near Charleston, the Five Mile House and the Six Mile House. It is not clear whether the Six Mile House was a hotel, but it served as a hideout for a number of outlaws..."

— Source: Lavinia Fisher Wikipedia

Rec Room

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